Saturday, 23 June 2018

You Can Manifest Money Using Crystals & The Law Of Attraction

Citrine

Learn to manifest money, by combining golden yellow manifestation crystals with the LOA aka the laws of attraction. These universal laws help to increase abundance and prosperity in your life.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/manifest-money.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Daily Mirror: Tory minister demands comedian Ricky Gervais apologises for branding M.E. sufferers ‘lazy’ in offensive joke | 23 June 2018

 


By John Siddle and Nicola Bartlett, Daily Mirror, 22 June 2018.

A Government minister has demanded Ricky Gervais publicly apologise for a joke branding ME sufferers “lazy”. The Office funnyman was called out in a parliamentary debate and accused of stigmatising the disease.

Steve Brine, MP, Minister for Health and Social Care.

MP Steve Brine criticised Gervais for an old gag where he allegedly described ME as “the one where…‘I don’t feel like going to work today’.”

The Minister for Primary Care said:

“We recognise that people with ME have encountered significant stigma, in part due to the unfavourable media representations of the condition that not only go back to the 1980s but have continued in recent times.”

Mr Brine used the the offensive joke as an example, telling MPs:

“I have to say that Ricky Gervais is a very talented comic but given that he’s quite active on Twitter, maybe he could just be asked to retract that and apologise to the ME community for that comment today on Twitter.”

The minister was speaking during a three-hour parliamentary debate on the lack of funding for medical research into ME.

Politicians called for controversial psychotherapy and exercise therapies recommended by the NHS after a ‘flawed’ medical trial must stop because it is making patients worse.

They called for an end to stigma and myths surrounding ME.

Westminster Hall was told how people with ME are six times more likely to commit suicide.

ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) affects 250,000 people in the UK, with tens of thousands left bedbound, housebound and unable to work.

Sufferers have had to face barbs of laziness and hysteria after the illness was dubbed ‘Yuppie Flu’ in the 1980s.

Carol Monaghan (SNP, Glasgow North West) told the debate how ME costs the UK £3.3bn per year.

She said: “Despite the number of people affected, and the devastating affect this disease has on suffers and indeed, their families, it is very much a hidden illness.

“Characterised as ‘yuppie flu’, and misunderstood by doctors and politicians alike, it receives little funding, and treatment is often damaging.”

This video begins with the stand-up routine from Ricky Gervais and was on published on YouTube in 2009

A spokesman for the ME Association warned about the dangers of the comedian’s remarks:

“Ricky Gervais might think he’s just funny but by peddling outdated stigmas about a disease in which people are taking their own lives is far from a joke.

“It would be fantastic to see Gervais spearhead our call for more funding and research into ME.

“ME is real. It’s devastating. It leaves people, at best, struggling to work. At worst, it leaves them enduring a tortuous existence, a living death, where they are unable to take their place in society.

“More must be done to end the torment of so many missing behind closed curtains.”


 

 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/daily-mirror-tory-minister-demands-comedian-ricky-gervais-apologises-for-branding-m-e-sufferers-lazy-in-offensive-joke-23-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Rochdale News: MP calls for ‘much more to be done to tackle M.E.’ | 23 June 2018

 


Rochdale Online: 22 June 2018.

Liz McInnes, Member of Parliament for Heywood and Middleton, has called for “much more to be done to tackle ME” during a three-hour debate about the debilitating illness at Westminster Hall on Thursday (21 June).

The debate, led by Carol Monaghan MP (SNP, Glasgow NW) and Nicky Morgan (Con), heard numerous accounts from MPs about Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and its effects on those who suffer it, and how much more needs to be done to raise recognition, diagnosis and treatment of this severe illness.

Liz McInnes, MP for Heywood and Middleton, Greater Manchester.

Liz McInnes MP raised the heartbreaking case of Merryn Crofts from Norden, one of only two people to have ME stated as the cause of death.

Earlier this year, a coroner ruled that 21-year-old Merryn Crofts was the youngest person to die from the illness after a six-year battle with very severe ME.

Liz McInnes MP said: “ME is such a misunderstood illness, as the sad case of Merryn Crofts from Norden demonstrates.

“Merryn Crofts was my constituent and lived in Norden. I spoke with her Mum, Clare, this week who told me that the reports about Merryn in the Newspapers didn’t really cover the whole of Merryn’s condition.

“Merryn was totally bedbound; she physically could not get out of bed. She suffered so badly from postural hypotension that she blacked out if placed in a sitting position. She was hypersensitive to noise, light, touch and movement, and suffered so badly from pain that she could not get out of bed.

Merryn was bed-bound for the last three years of her life.

“After speaking with Merryn’s mum Clare and taking part in the Westminster Hall debate today, it’s clear to me that much more needs to be done to tackle ME and to help those who suffer its awful symptoms.

“Among other things, we need to invest more in training for our Doctors, especially General Practitioners who are the clinicians likely to be the first port of call for those suffering with ME – our GPs need to have the skills to be able to recognise the signs & symptoms and to signpost patients to the appropriate specialists.”

Addressing the debate, Merryn’s family added:

“It was a momentous day for ME as the Scottish MP Carol Monaghan raised a three-hour cross-party parliamentary debate about it. It was an amazing debate with much support and hopefully the start of change for people with ME.

“It was especially poignant for us as yesterday was the one year anniversary of Merryn’s funeral and so lovely on that day to hear Carol Monaghan speak Merryn’s own words at the start of her opening speech. We’re so proud our darling girl is still helping to bring change and stop the continued abuse of people with ME.

“These were Merryn’s words that Carol so beautifully read out:

“Having Severe ME is like being trapped in your own body every single day. There is no rest, you are bedbound all day every day.

 

“It snatches the most simple things away from you, like being able to wash yourself, even in bed. Being cared for in every way possible. In terrible pain, from everything. Not being able to talk on the phone or have visitors and feeling worse saying no every time someone asks again.

 

“Months and months in hospital. Severe infections. Breathing problems. Low immunity. Problems anywhere and everywhere in the body. Paralysis. Severe hypersensitivity. The list is endless and, if I was physically able to type, I would carry on. Spread awareness and remember all of us and all of those who have lost their lives.”

Since 2012, the government has invested an average of £558,333 each year into ME research – just £2.23 per patient, per year.

Despite being recognised by the World Health Organisation as a neurological disease, and a report from the Chief Medical Officer of Health calling for more research and a network of hospital-based clinics, many doctors still don’t know how to diagnose and manage ME.

“Having Severe ME is like being trapped in your own body every single day. There is no rest, you are bedbound all day every day.”

Lack of research means that there aren’t any effective forms of treatment, despite quality of life studies revealing the level of disability experienced with ME can be just as great as many other serious medical conditions, including cancer and multiple sclerosis.

While some people with ME do improve over the course of time, it is only a small minority that return to full normal health.

A spokesman for the ME Association, which campaigns to make the UK a better place for people with the illness, said:

“ME is real. It’s devastating. It leaves people, at best, struggling to work. At worst, it leaves them enduring a tortuous existence, a living death, where they are unable to take their place in society.

“More than 250,000 people – and 250,000 families – are affected by this devastating disease and it is not before time that this horrendous illness has been debated in parliament.

“We are extremely grateful to Carol Monaghan MP for securing the debate – but in truth, the hard work starts now. One in four are so severely affected that they are housebound, bedbound, and in some cases unable to shower, clothe, or feed themselves.

“People are taking their lives because they cannot bear the torture this illness brings. Others describe themselves as rotting behind closed curtains.

“This is a completely unacceptable situation for a disease, costing the UK economy around £3.5billion in lost taxes, healthcare and benefit costs.

“There is no cure – and the longer it will take to find one unless funding dramatically increases.”

For more information on ME, or to donate towards medical research, visit: meassociation.org.uk


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/rochdale-news-mp-calls-for-much-more-to-be-done-to-tackle-m-e-23-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Photo | Spiritual





from Spiritual Seeker 77
http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/post/175164503842

from http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/

#spiritual

Friday, 22 June 2018

Elestial Quartz Have Deep Spiritual Healing Energy

Smoky Elestial Quartz

Elestial quartz crystals bring you an infusion of high vibration love and light from the higher realms. They aid contact with spirit beings and angels, and boost clairvoyance, clairaudience and clairsentience.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/elestial-quartz.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

MPs demand more biomedical research for cruel ‘death sentence’ disease | 22 June 2018

 


ME Association Press Release, By John Siddle, 21 June 2018.

MP’s demanded more funding for research into a cruel “death sentence” disease affecting 250,000 people in the UK – and the immediate end to NHS-recommended treatments that are making patients worse.

Carol Monaghan, MP for Glasgow North-West, led the debate on M.E. in Westminster Hall.

Less than £1 is spent each year on people suffering from the devastating invisible illness M.E. (myalgic encephalomyelitis), a condition which leaves tens of thousands bedbound, housebound and unable to work.

Parliament heard in a landmark three-hour debate of the chronic lack of funding for medical research and how many doctors still don’t know how to diagnose or manage the condition.

End to controversial therapies and to stigma

Politicians said that controversial psychotherapy and exercise therapies recommended by the NHS after a flawed medical trial must stop NOW – because they are making patients worse.

And they called for an end to the stigma and myths surrounding M.E., which at worst, leaves sufferers to endure a tortuous existence.

Westminster Hall was told how people with M.E. are six times more likely to commit suicide.

Carol Monaghan (SNP Glasgow North West) told how ME costs the UK £3.3bn per year.

She said: “Despite the number of people affected and the devastating effect of the disease on sufferers and their families, it is very much a hidden illness, which is characterised by some as ‘yuppie flu’ and misunderstood by doctors, the public and politicians alike.

M.E. tragedies

Westminster Hall heard of the tragic case of 21-year-old Merryn Crofts, who last month had M.E. listed as the cause of her death at inquest, and how ME Association fundraising manager, Helen Hyland, broke the news of her husband’s suicide to her children.

Yet Ms Monaghan added:
“Some people consider M.E. to be a psychological condition, despite the fact that people with M.E. are not allowed to be blood or organ donors.

“Unfortunately, those who hold such beliefs often are in influential positions and have a blinkered view of the condition.

“I wonder what they have to fear from proper biomedical research into M.E. If such research showed they were correct, their views would be vindicated. However, if it threw up new information that had an impact on M.E. treatment and care, as medical professionals they should surely support that.”

The discredited PACE trial

Ms Monaghan drew particular attention to the PACE trial results in 2011, that examined graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT).

The researchers claimed the results demonstrated both treatments were ‘moderately’ effective and led to recovery in over a fifth of patients.

But the trial has since faced intense criticism, and not only from patients in the UK. Clinicians, researchers, as well as charities, like the ME Association, have all expressed concern about how the results were obtained, analysed and presented.

Parliament has previously heard claims that the PACE trial data was deliberately flawed to “remove people from long-term benefits and reduce the welfare bill”. The PACE trial endorsement of GET and CBT helped form the basis of the NICE clinical guideline – which is now being reviewed.

PACE has had a wide-reaching influence

Ms Monaghan said one of the key authors behind the PACE trial, Professor Michael Sharpe, admitted that some involved in the trial had worked for insurance companies.

She said:
“The PACE trial, which recommended CBT and GET, influences how health insurers and the DWP make their decisions.

“Insurance companies refuse to pay out unless a programme of GET has been undertaken, and many people who apply for benefits are told that they must carry out GET—or, indeed, that they appear well enough to work.

“PACE is unique in UK medical history, in that it was part-funded by the DWP.

“The links of some of its main authors to health insurance companies are troubling. One of those authors, Professor Michael Sharpe, states in his briefing for the debate:

“Several of the investigators had done small amounts of independent consultancy for insurance companies, but this was not relevant to the trial. The insurance companies played no part in the trial.”

“I will leave hon. Members to make up their own minds about that.”

Westminster Hall was told how the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Dutch Health Council have both abandoned GET as a treatment.

Ms Monaghan added:
“If those countries acknowledge the flaws of GET, why are ME sufferers in the UK having to fight so hard for similar acknowledgement? The ME community hopes that GET will not feature in the NICE guidelines for ME treatment after they are revised.”

‘Unbecoming’ behaviour?

“Interestingly, Professor Sharpe, one of the authors of the PACE trial whom I already mentioned, emailed me this week and told me that my behaviour is “unbecoming of an MP”.

“I say to Professor Sharpe that if listening to my constituents, investigating their concerns and taking action as a result is “unbecoming”, I stand guilty.

“If Members of Parliament are not willing to stand up for the most vulnerable in society, what hope do any of us have?”

Ministerial response

Minister for Health and Social Care, Steve Brine, was asked how the Department for Health is supporting training for medical practitioners on ME care and treatment, and asked if he would support proper funding for medical research into the diagnosis and treatment of ME.

Steve Brine, Minister for Health and Social Care, and Conservative MP for Winchester.

Mr Brine said the government invests £1.7bn each year into health research.

And stated that the National Institute for Health Research and the Medical Research Council would welcome “high-quality” research into “all aspects of ME… to make a scientific breakthrough”.

He described the need to find a breakthrough as a “matter of good Christian humanity” and promised to help increase the awareness of M.E. with GPs.

He reiterated that patients with M.E. symptoms should be referred to NHS specialist services – within six months for mild symptoms, three months for moderate symptoms and immediately for severe symptoms.

But Mr Brine admitted that access to services remained “a big and ongoing issue” and that the configuration of services was down to local commissioning groups.

He added that all schools must have arrangements in place to support, with flexibility, children with ME.

NICE guideline review

On the NICE guidelines, he said it was a “jolly good job” the position on M.E. is being updated but said it would be “wrong for ministers to interfere” with the process.

On benefits, Mr Brine said the “DWP recognises that ME is a real and disabling condition” and that every patient must be assessed on a individual basis.

He added:
“When assessing claimants, healthcare professionals are expected to be mindful of the fact that many illnesses—including ME—produce symptoms that vary in intensity over time, and they are instructed not to base their opinion solely on the situation observed at the assessment.

“The DWP assures me that all healthcare professionals are required to read an evidence-based protocol on ME as part of their training, as well as engaging in a programme of continuing medical education that includes modules on the condition.”

‘A completely unacceptable situation’

The ME Association campaigns to make the UK a better place for people with M.E. A spokesman said:

“A three-hour parliamentary debate on M.E. is not before time. We are grateful to Carol Monaghan for securing the debate, to those MP’s who took part, and to ME Association members for engaging with their parliamentary representatives ahead of the debate.

“Despite being recognised by the World Health Organisation as a neurological disease – and an earlier report to the Chief Medical Officer calling for more research and a network of hospital-based clinics – many doctors still don’t know how to diagnose and manage M.E. and lack of biomedical research means that we still don’t have any effective forms of treatment.

“This is a completely unacceptable situation for a disease that is twice as common as multiple sclerosis and where a new report has estimated that M.E. is costing the UK economy billions in lost taxes, and through healthcare and benefit expenditure.”


The images above of people with M.E. have been taken from the ME Association, Real M.E. campaign. It seeks to demonstrate that this devastating neurological condition can affect people from all walks of life, at any age, and that it doesn’t discriminate in terms of gender or race.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/mps-demand-more-biomedical-research-funding-for-cruel-death-sentence-disease-22-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

The complete Ministerial response from the Parliamentary debate on M.E. treatment and research in Westminster Hall | 22 June 2018

 


Following yesterday’s landmark three-hour debate led by Carol Monaghan, MP, in Westminster Hall on myalgic encephalomyelitis, an official transcript was produced that enables us to read exactly what Steve Brine, the Minister for Health and Social Care, had to say in response to the issues that were raised.

You can still watch and even download the video of the debate, and the ME Association will be publishing the press release we produced by way of summary of the proceedings later today, along with comment from Dr Charles Shepherd – who was present at the debate – and from Helen Hyland – our fundraising manager – whose personal story was read out by her MP, Stephen Kerr.

The debate received wide cross-party support, and at it’s peak, twenty-five MP’s were present, with thirteen making contributions. There were also several people affected by M.E. at the meeting. The number of MP’s was seen by all concerned as a significant contribution especially for a Thursday afternoon, and underlined the importance of M.E. and the pressing need for change.

The Minister spoke for approximately 24 minutes, and his formal response was followed by a short speech from Carol Monaghan, which closed the debate at 4.17pm.

Read The Full Hansard Transcript

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care (Steve Brine)

“I shall start where everyone else has started and thank the hon. Member for Glasgow North West (Carol Monaghan), who secured this important debate, very much. She did so along with my right hon. Friend the Member for Loughborough (Nicky Morgan), who has to be in her constituency today to deal with a royal visit—lucky her.

M.E. is an incapacitating condition with a plethora of symptoms

Steve Brine, Minister for Health and Social Care, and Conservative MP for Winchester.

“Raising awareness of this debilitating condition is critical, and the hon. Member for Glasgow North West has undertaken significant work in this area over a number of years. Thirteen—lucky for us—Back Benchers spoke in today’s debate. I counted 25 Members present at our peak, which is excellent. I spend a lot of time with the hon. Member for Strangford (Jim Shannon) in Westminster Hall, it must be said, but that is a lot of MPs for a Tuesday afternoon, let alone a Thursday afternoon, so that is excellent.

“As we have heard, ME, otherwise known as chronic fatigue syndrome, is an incapacitating condition with a plethora of symptoms, primarily characterised by long-term fatigue, chronic pain and post-exertional symptoms of malaise, to name but a few. There are many more and we have heard some excellent testimony of those from Members on behalf of their constituents.

M.E. can lead to almost no life

“As so many have said, the underlying causes of the condition, which for brevity I will call ME, are still poorly understood. There is no one diagnostic test to identify it, and although some people can and do improve and recover, there is currently no cure. That is a hard reality to face. Although the severity of symptoms and therefore the impact vary, ME can lead to poor attendance and affect outcomes at school for young people.

“I have a constituent in exactly that position with whom I am in regular correspondence—I will not name her but she knows who she is and I wish her and her mum well. ME can result in significant or indefinite time off work or job loss in adults; reduction or complete cessation of daily activities, which can lead to isolation and strain within families and the breakdown of marriages; and overall poor quality of life. As my hon. Friend the Member for Stirling (Stephen Kerr) said, it can lead to almost no life for some people and their loved ones.

Praise for M.E. documentary Unrest…

“I am surprised that other than the hon. Member for Bristol East (Kerry McCarthy), nobody mentioned “Unrest”. I know it well. Some constituents came to see me to tell me about the film. It had screenings in Winchester and Chandler’s Ford in my constituency, which were oversubscribed—packed to the gunwales—and there was not a dry eye in the house.

“I pay great tribute to Jennifer and her partner Omar who made that film. I am sure there were times when it gave Jennifer’s life a great purpose, but I am sure there were times when she wanted to say, “Get that bleeping camera out of my life!” There is a touching moment at the very start of the film when she says that when she was a young girl, she wanted to eat the world “whole”, because she wanted to see it all and do it all. That went to the heart of her great disappointment that she was so sick.

“Jennifer set out very clearly and movingly the sheer ups and downs of this condition. For some, it is almost a constant down. I was struck by watching her at the Princeton University reunion day, during the rather surreal procession through the streets by old boys and girls from Princeton. She so enjoyed seeing old friends that day and looked full of life, but within an hour of it finishing she was absolutely poleaxed on the floor, saying that she felt her eyes were being pushed out of her head from the inside. It was horrible to watch.

“It was interesting how the film moved around the different wild and crazy treatments that are out there on the internet. If hon. Members google any condition, they will see lots of wild and crazy treatments, but that is particularly the case with ME. One of the saddest things in it, although it covered it well, was the point that my hon. Friend the Member for Cheltenham (Alex Chalk) raised of the suicides resulting from this condition.

…and for Millions Missing demonstrations

“Millions Missing was mentioned by many Members, and I see some people wearing t-shirts in the Public Gallery. The hon. Member for Ealing North (Stephen Pound) is right that it has had some bad PR, but it is getting its act together.

“Millions Missing is an absolutely brilliant way of encapsulating the problem. A number of Members mentioned the shoes; I was particularly moved by the messages on the shoes. They were outside Richmond House, where the Department of Health used to be, as part of the Millions Missing campaign.

“The mission was to write what you miss; somebody had written on a pair of ballet shoes, “I miss dancing in these shoes.” That was really moving and a human way of putting it. I might touch on the film again a little later.

Stephen Pound commented:
“I assure the hon. Gentleman that I was not implying any absence of PR skills on the part of the advocates and the people who suffer from this debilitating disease; I was anthropomorphising the actual disease itself.
“I stole the words of the hon. Member for Cheltenham (Alex Chalk) when we pitched this debate to the Backbench Business Committee, because he was not in Westminster Hall at the time.”

“That is so unlike the hon. Gentleman. Good clarification.

The stigma surrounding M.E.

“The stigma quite rightly has been mentioned by pretty much everyone who has spoken today. We recognise that people with ME have encountered significant stigma, in part due to the unfavourable media representations of the condition that not only go back to the 1980s but have continued in recent times.

“I have seen a clip of Ricky Gervais in one of his otherwise amusing stage shows, when he says of ME, “Yes, that’s the one where they say I don’t want to go to work today.” Ricky Gervais is a very talented comic, but given that he is quite active on Twitter, perhaps he could retract that and apologise to the ME community today. Perhaps he could put #ME so we can look out for it.

“My right hon. Friend the Member for New Forest West (Sir Desmond Swayne) made a very good point about mental health; it is totally wrong and insulting to say it is all in the head, but it also goes against the grain of what we are talking about in modern-day healthcare: the parity between mental and physical health. There must be a parity, and to suggest that that somehow lessens it is wrong. His intervention was timely and good.

Minister is in no doubt as to the legitimacy of M.E.

“The physical impacts of the condition have an impact on mental health, as other hon. Members have said. I am also the Minister with responsibility for cancer, so I speak in lots of debates in Westminster Hall and we talk about the mental health impact of cancer—the hon. Member for Washington and Sunderland West (Mrs Hodgson) knows all about them. A recent example was when we talked about the mental impact of blood cancer.

“People with ME often report that the legitimacy of their symptoms has been questioned by family, friends, employers, healthcare professionals—yes—and society as a whole. Lest hon. Members did not understand it from my opening remarks, let me clear that Ministers—especially this one—are not among that group of people.

“That stigma can and does play a part in the development of the co-morbid symptoms of depression and anxiety, particularly for young people—I will come on to them in a minute—who keenly feel the consequences of the resultant social isolation at that moment of their development. As we have heard, suicide is not unheard of.

“We know that those who experience stigma often also experience discrimination, which has a profound negative effect on their lives. That is unacceptable, so I welcome the debate as a forum to raise awareness of ME and talking about it. The hon. Member for Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport (Luke Pollard) mentioned that MND is being talked about, and he is absolutely right. He is a very good communicator, and I think this will probably be one of his next Facebook Live sessions.

“He is nodding. It is important that we raise awareness and educate people, including me, about the condition and its impact on people’s lives.

M.E. Research

“I will now turn to the two issues that have primarily been debated today, research and treatment. On research, the Government invest more than £1.7 billion a year in health research via the National Institute for Health Research and the Medical Research Council through UK Research and Innovation.

“The NIHR and MRC welcome high-quality applications for research into all aspects of CFS and ME, which would certainly include the biomedical research that the hon. Member for Glasgow North West spoke about in her opening remarks.

  • £2.62 million in biomedical research since 2011

“Since 2011, the MRC has funded seven projects on CFS/ME totalling £2.62 million, and it is ready to support further applications of the highest scientific quality, which is required to make those scientific breakthroughs.

“My hon. Friend the Member for North West Norfolk (Sir Henry Bellingham) is no longer in his place, but he spoke about the Norwich Research Park—didn’t he push that a few times?—which sounds very promising. I look forward to hearing more about it, and I feel certain that he will tell me.

“The MRC has had an open cross-board highlight notice on ME since 2003. It was updated in 2011 alongside a bespoke funding call in that year. ME research remains an area of high strategic importance for the MRC.

“Applications that focus on the underpinning mechanisms of ME are encouraged, with priority areas including immune dysregulation—[Interruption.] Sorry, I am distracted by someone shouting about stopping something outside—I think he is saying, “Stop ME!”. The priority areas include pain, improved sub-phenotyping and stratification of ME, and mechanisms of ME in children and young people.

“A number of people mentioned the late Baroness Jowell. I was very privileged to meet her. I did so just the once, but I was left in no doubt about her resolve on the issue of brain tumours. Let me say in reference to her and to the research environment that, as my Parliamentary Private Secretary, my hon. Friend the Member for South Suffolk (James Cartlidge), reminded me, that journey started around the time of a Westminster Hall debate. Perhaps that is a good sign.

“Our challenge with brain tumour research is the lack of high-quality research proposals that have come forward. The late Baroness Jowell was passionate about stimulating the research community to get that situation changed, and we have latched on to that. That is one of her great legacies. I would hazard a guess that her greatest legacy is yet to be reached, but that is one reason it is important to mention her today.

  • £3.37 million in applied health research since 2011

“The NIHR has, since 2011, provided £3.37 million of funding for projects and training on ME. That might not be termed biomedical research, but as with other disorders, given that the cause and mechanisms of the condition are still poorly understood, it is important that we carry out both biomedical research, to further our understanding, and applied health research, to improve the treatment offered to people with ME now and to help to improve their symptoms and quality of life.

  • CMRC, MRC and NIHR working on new approach

“The NIHR and the MRC recognise that ME is a debilitating condition and are working with the UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative, which was mentioned towards the end of the debate, and with patient representatives on how best they can support a joined-up approach to encourage high-quality research into this complex disorder. I mentioned that Baroness Jowell is a good example of how to start such research. They hope to be able to update colleagues on those discussions by the end of the year, and I for one will look keenly for that update.

“For Members who do not know about that important collaboration, it was set up in 2013 to promote high-quality basic and applied research into ME. The CMRC brings together researchers, major funders and charities, and provides them with a mechanism for working together in a co-ordinated and collaborative way, increasing awareness of ME in the research community—that is so important if we are going to stimulate applications—highlighting priorities for research funding and increasing such funding. Both the NIHR and the MRC sit as observers on the CMRC board.

“Everyone who contributed to the debate spoke passionately, but the hon. Member for Ealing North spoke particularly passionately, and I liked his point about humanity. This is a matter of good Christian humanity in many ways.

GP training and medical education: online course for M.E.

“The Royal College of General Practitioners oversees GP training in England. It provides an online course for GPs and other primary care practitioners that includes an overview of the presentation, diagnosis, assessment and ongoing management of ME. The course highlights common misconceptions about ME and considers the challenges that surround that complex condition for patients, carers and primary care professionals. It is produced as part of the METRIC study, which is funded by the NIHR.

“Of course GPs can always know more and learn more, but let me speak up for them for a moment. They are called “general practitioners”. Be a GP for a day—it is incredibly difficult to know everything about everything and to be a master of all. General practice is, though, where most patients with ME are likely to be managed, certainly in the first instance.

  • Key area of knowledge

“The condition is identified as a key area of clinical knowledge in the RCGP Applied Knowledge Test content guide. The AKT is a summative assessment of the knowledge base that underpins general practice in England and a key part of GPs’ qualifying exams.

“Although I understand hon. Members’ points about raising awareness among medical professionals, and as a result of the debate I will redouble my efforts to do that as part of my role as Minister for primary care, all GPs certainly should be aware of ME, and should maintain their clinical knowledge of it and other conditions, as part of their commitment to continuing professional development.

“Indeed, I have resolved—I have already sent a note to myself—to send a copy of the report of the debate to Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, who currently leads the RCGP, and to ask for the college’s latest thinking about this subject.

Diagnosis and treatment

“Before any medical condition can begin to be treated, it must be diagnosed. That goes to the heart of our challenge. As the symptoms of ME often resemble those of many other debilitating illnesses—we heard about Lyme disease—there is no test with which to make an accurate diagnosis.

“ME, therefore, is not always easy to diagnose, to put it mildly. Diagnosis relies on clinical observation of symptoms by healthcare professionals. We understand that that can be frustrating, to put it mildly, for patients—and, it must be said, for their clinicians.

  • NHS specialist services for M.E.

“People with ME should be referred to a specialist service, where care should be based on their needs, on the type, complexity and severity of their symptoms, and on the presence of comorbidities. That decision should be made jointly by the patient and their healthcare professionals.

“As the shadow Minister said, referral to specialist ME care should be offered within six months of presentation to people with milder symptoms, within three to four months of presentation to people with moderate symptoms, and immediately to people with severe symptoms. Clinicians are responsible for advising patients about available treatment options.

  • Severe M.E.

“Of course I am aware that access to services for those with severe ME is a big and ongoing issue. Under the Health and Social Care Act 2012, the configuration of services is a matter for local NHS commissioners, who have to be best placed to deliver services for their area.

  • Report to chief medical officer on M.E. (2002)

“A number of Members referred to the report of the chief medical officer’s independent working group on ME, which was published in 2002. Following that, a central investment programme of £8.5 million was established to address the service gaps across England—I am responsible for the NHS in England.

“That included the establishment of 13 centres of expertise across the country, 36 multidisciplinary community teams for adults and 11 specialist teams for children and young people, and facilitation of access to advice on clinical management for patients, families and health professionals.

Social care services

“Linked to that—the Department is, of course, now called the Department of Health and Social Care—the vast majority of people with severe ME and their families will come into contact with social care services at some point.

“The Care Act 2014 requires a local authority to carry out a needs assessment where an adult or carer appears to have care and support needs. The local authority must then decide whether the person has eligible needs by considering the outcomes they want to achieve, their needs, and how those impact on their overall wellbeing. Where a person is assessed as having eligible care and support needs, those must be met by their local authority.

Children and young people with M.E.

“Let me say some more about children and young people, who were mentioned by a number of Members. There is a powerful moment in “Unrest” where a young lady is celebrating her birthday. She says, “I remember my 16th birthday in this bed, and my 17th birthday, and my 18th birthday”—and she goes on through; I think she was celebrating her 22nd birthday in the film. Although access to services was raised, I know that access to education is also a huge issue for children and young people with ME.

“All schools have a legal duty to make arrangements to support pupils with a medical condition in school. Guidance to schools states that they should put in place arrangements that show an understanding of how medical conditions affect a pupil’s ability to learn and give parents and young people confidence in the school’s ability to provide effective support for their condition.

  • Healthcare plan

“Children and young people with ME should have an individual healthcare plan, which should normally be drawn up in partnership with the school, healthcare professionals, parents and the young person, and should be tailored to their needs.

  • Flexible and appropriate education

“Schools and other services should work together to ensure that children and young people with ME receive an education that is flexible and appropriate. That could mean programmes of study that rely on part-time attendance, in combination with alternative provision or home schooling, which was mentioned.

“Consideration should also be given to how children and young people are integrated back into school after a period of absence, when they are feeling better and, hopefully, more able physically to cope.

The NICE clinical guideline on ME/CFS

“A lot was said about NICE guidelines, which are clearly a sensitive topic and a source of much unhappiness among Members and the wider ME community. According to NICE guidelines, recommended treatments for ME include cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy.

  • Right to refuse treatment

“I know that many patients disagree with those treatments, and we heard powerful testimony about that. The NICE guideline is clear that there is no one form of treatment to suit every patient; that the personal needs and preferences of the patient should be taken into account; that doctors should explain that no single strategy will be successful for all patients; and that, in common with all people receiving NHS care, ME patients have the right to refuse or withdraw from any part of their treatment that they do not agree with or they think is doing them harm.

  • Full review welcomed… with a caveat…

“As we heard, the NICE guideline is being updated—a jolly good job, too. NICE will look at the current evidence base, including the PACE trial, which has been debated at length in the House before. Of course, we welcome NICE’s decision to undertake a full review of ME guidelines.

“Many of the ME charities we have heard about today are registered to take part in the guideline development process, but NICE is the independent expert body responsible for developing robust, evidence-based guidance for the NHS to design services that are in line with the best available evidence, and no one should hide from the evidence.

“It would be inappropriate and wrong for Ministers to interfere with the process, but I feel sure that NICE will be listening to the debate and taking a keen interest in it.

Carol Monaghan commented:
“The Minister has rightly said that any patient has the right to withdraw from medical treatment.
“However, when the DWP is saying that patients must undertake graded exercise therapy, and when health insurance companies are saying that they must undertake graded exercise therapy, it puts the patient in a very difficult position.”

“I fully appreciate that point—the hon. Lady put it on the record very well earlier—which takes us on very neatly to welfare benefits.

Welfare benefits

“The hon. Members who requested the debate also flagged the issue of benefits. I know they would like, and are having, an ongoing conversation with the DWP. I am clearly not a DWP Minister—they wanted a Health Minister to respond to the debate, and that is what they have.

  • Assessments should not be based solely on appearance at interview

“The DWP obviously recognises that ME is a real and disabling condition. Entitlement to benefits depends on the disabling effects of the condition, which of course must be taken on an individual basis. When assessing claimants, healthcare professionals are expected to be mindful of the fact that many illnesses—including ME—produce symptoms that vary in intensity over time, and they are instructed not to base their opinion solely on the situation observed at the assessment.

“The DWP assures me that all healthcare professionals are required to read an evidence-based protocol on ME as part of their training, as well as engaging in a programme of continuing medical education that includes modules on the condition.

  • Future engagement with DWP

“From what I have heard today, Members clearly feel that that is not happening— certainly not in a consistent way. I will take an action from the debate to send a copy of what has been said to the relevant Minister—I believe it is the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, my hon. Friend the Member for Truro and Falmouth (Sarah Newton)—at the DWP.

“However, I encourage members of the all-party group to seek more and continuing engagement with the DWP on this issue. I will certainly follow that up with them.

Closing remarks

“Once again, I thank the hon. Member for Glasgow North West, who opened the debate, and her colleagues who secured the debate through the Backbench Business Committee for raising the issues of ME research and treatment on behalf of those affected—their constituents and mine.

“I welcome this and all other opportunities to raise awareness within the House. Ultimately, raising awareness is what we can do, and that can lead to action and real change, as we saw within the brain tumour community.

  • No politics in M.E.

“I thank the ME charities—they are very active in my part of the world, in Hampshire—for their continuing work in this area. What has been fascinating today, as always with debates in my portfolio, is that I have not heard one single person mention their party political colours.

“There really is no politics in ME, and nor should there be. I want to see us come together at our true, cross-party best to focus on the needs of people with ME and see if we can move the research agenda forward in this area.

“I think the hon. Member for Glasgow North West said in her opening remarks that professionals should welcome research, because evidence-based treatment is ultimately the basis of their training. I welcome such research.

“I echo what has been said, and on the email that she read out earlier—clearly, I have not seen it and have only heard her reporting of it; I think she will give it to me afterwards—I hope that that will be the second apology received as a result of my remarks today. I look forward to being copied into that.

  • Research: CMRC, MRC and NIHR

“As I said earlier, the NIHR and MRC are speaking to the UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative and patient representatives about how they can best support a joined-up approach to high-quality research into this complex disorder.

“I hope they will update colleagues about those discussions later in the year. I will end with what Jennifer said right at the end of “Unrest”:

“every book I read…said, ‘when you fall ill, either you…find the cure or die trying.’ It always ends in triumph or tragedy. But that’s not my story—at least not yet.”

“That is how she put it.”


Carol Monaghan, MP for Glasgow North West

“I thank hon. Members once again—Thursday afternoon is not an easy time to stay behind for a debate, and I really appreciate the fact that they have done so. I also appreciate the great support from the people in the Public Gallery, many of whom are living with ME. It has been tough enough for us to sit here for three hours, so it must have been a hard slog for them. I hope they do not feel the impact of the debate too badly over the next few days.

Social media support for Members

“I have been following the debate on Twitter, and it has been interesting to see the messages of support coming in for individual Members. People really are watching and were interested and encouraged by what they heard. Although we are talking about treatment and diagnosis in the UK, the repercussions are far wider. Messages of support have been coming in from Norway, Canada, the United States and right across Europe. ME affects people worldwide, and I hope the debate has given them some hope.

More than just raising awareness

“The debate was about more than just raising awareness. Members asked specific questions, and I am glad the Minister said that he would work with the DWP to draw up guidelines for people with ME. We will all watch that with interest, and perhaps some parliamentary questions will go in as a result.

Disappointed about research

“I was also a bit disappointed. The Minister, who is a compassionate person, talked about funding, and I think he said that the Medical Research Council is putting £2.6 million into ME research. Unfortunately, that is not for biomedical research—or little of it is.

“I quickly googled and found that a new research programme is taking place at Bath University, but, once again, it is at the department of psychology. That is where we have the trouble: it is not a psychology department that needs to be doing research, but a medicine or biomedical sciences department.

“Members have spoken passionately on the ME community’s behalf, and once again I thank everyone here this afternoon. I do not see this as the end. The fight for people with ME both here and across the world continues.”


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/the-complete-ministerial-response-from-the-parliamentary-debate-on-m-e-treatment-and-research-in-westminster-hall-22-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Thursday, 21 June 2018

Ulexite For Telepathy, Clairvoyance, Far Seeing and Imagination

Ulexite

Discover how Ulexite assists you to read the energy and intentions of others and stimulates telepathy or thought transference. It aids creativity and helps you to unlock your imagination.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/ulexite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

MEA Fundraising: Sarah’s Big Shave for M.E. | 20 June 2018

 


Helen Hyland, Fundraising Manager, ME Association.

Sarah Summers is aiming to go way outside her comfort zone by shaving her head for a charity close to her heart.

Sarah Summers with her mother, Jeannette.

Her mother Jeannette developed M.E. or chronic fatigue syndrome over 5 years ago.

And Sarah is keen to raise funds for a charity that supports her mother and thousands like her – The ME Association.

Sunday, 1st July is now the date when everything takes place.

Sarah writes: “When my mum was diagnosed with M.E I was very worried for her. It scared me to see what she had become.

“My beautiful mum used to be very outgoing and very bubbly. She used to walk for miles with her friends and would be very happy in herself.

“She now finds it very hard to walk very far at all; she will need to rest for hours after walking just a fraction of the distance she used to manage. She is constantly tired, and having to fight through it every day.

“M.E is different for each person, from mild to severe. My mum is pretty lucky because she isn’t bedridden. But we are frightened that she may become so in the future if the illness progresses.

“She hates having to cancel plans to meet friends because she is still struggling to work and must conserve her precious energy for that alone. She must continue to work because she’s recently been denied disability benefit.

“It’s not just the tiredness: her muscles ache and pain can creep in whenever she does too much. She has ‘foggy brain’ which is where she feels like a cloud has taken over her mind, she can’t think clearly and gets very confused easily.

“It’s very frustrating for her and upsetting for me. Even playing with her two grandchildren brings happiness but extreme exhaustion after.

“Unfortunately for M.E sufferers there is currently no cure, and some are known to have died because of this horrid illness. This has GOT to stop! Research is vital if we are to change the situation for the better.

“My mum means the world to me and after 5 years of seeing really struggle with the illness, I decided that I finally needed to do my bit for M.E. and help raise funds for all those affected by it.

“I have social anxiety, and my beautiful hair means so much to me, so getting it shaved off is a really big deal. It is my Mum’s unconditional love that is giving me the inner strength to go through with this challenge. I am determined to succeed!

“You can help today by donating to my fundraising page. Let’s destroy M.E together. And if you want to learn more about why I’m doing this, please watch my video.”


The ME Association

Please help us continue our work

Please donate – whatever you can afford – to help us continue with our work to make the UK a better place for people with M.E. Just click the button below to visit our JustGiving page:

Or why not join the ME Association as a member and become a part of our growing community? For a monthly (or annual) payment you will not only be helping to keep us doing what we do best, but will receive our exclusive ME Essential magazine.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/mea-fundraising-sarahs-big-shave-for-m-e-20-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Rochdale News: For years dismissed as ‘laziness’, but now cruel disease is finally getting attention it deserves | 20 June 2018

 


Rochdale Online, 19th June, 2018.

A devastating disease that for years was cruelly dismissed as laziness is to be discussed in a landmark three-hour parliamentary debate on Thursday (21 June).

Merryn Crofts died aged just 21 after battling ME

ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) affects 250,000 people in the UK and presents as an exhaustion so severe that it leaves people, at best, struggling to work, and at worst, leaving sufferers to endure a tortuous existence, a living death, where they are unable to take their place in society.

People living with ME have been disbelieved, stigmatised and told it’s ‘all in their heads’ – despite one in four being so severely affected that they are housebound, bedbound, and in some cases, unable to shower, clothe, or feed themselves.

Earlier this year, a coroner ruled that 21-year-old Merryn Crofts, from Norden, was the youngest person to die from the illness after a six-year battle with very severe ME.

Parliamentary Debate

Now a three-hour Westminster Hall debate on Thursday afternoon (21 June, 1.30 to 4.30 pm), supported by the ME Association and other charities, will discuss treatments and research into the disease, which is estimated to cost the UK economy around £3.5billion in lost taxes, healthcare and benefit costs.

Many doctors still don’t know how to diagnose and manage ME, and lack or research means that there aren’t any effective forms of treatment, despite quality of life studies revealing the level of disability experienced with ME can be just as great as many other serious medical conditions, including cancer and multiple sclerosis.

While some people with ME do improve over the course of time, it is only a small minority that return to full normal health.

Merryn’s heartbreaking story is also understood to form part of the discussion, as one of only two people to have the disease officially recorded by a coroner as a cause of death.

The debate, led by Carol Monaghan MP (SNP, Glasgow NW) and Nicky Morgan (Con), has had cross-party support and will be attended by local MP for Middleton and Heywood, Liz McInnes, who confirmed she intends to speak during the debate.

Rochdale MP, Tony Lloyd confirmed that due to his role as a Shadow Cabinet member, he cannot participate in the debate, but will be watching closely.

He said: “Unfortunately it is a Westminster Hall debate, I cannot participate as a member of the Shadow Cabinet. However, I will of course be watching the debate closely and with interest.”

Ms Monaghan will call for more funding for medical research into the causes and mechanisms of the illness, which affects all ages, races and genders, and speak of the absence of effective treatment programmes.

Excellent Opportunity

Merryn’s family said: “We are really excited for the debate itself and think it’ll be an excellent opportunity for ME, as it will help show that the disease can be fatal.

Merryn Crofts (right) with her family

“Carol Monaghan has been personally in touch with Amy [Merryn’s sister] to ask if Merryn’s story can be mentioned and discussed during the debate to help show the reality of very severe ME, and the reality sufferers face in receiving recognition of their condition (and how this can then impact them becoming worse and more severe).”

Ms Monaghan said: “Scant press coverage and a desire for quick catchy headlines has meant that perceptions of ME as ‘yuppie flu’ or laziness are common, but surprisingly little is actually known about this condition.

“Many sufferers report that their ME was first triggered by a viral infection such as flu or glandular fever and have been battling with this debilitating condition ever since. Indeed, ME presents in much the same way as a flu with extreme headaches, muscular pain, poor appetite, sensitivity to light and broken sleep common. With ME however, these symptoms do not abate and can remain for many years.

“Elderly family members are often the main carers and the effect on relationships is significant, but despite this, there is little recognition of the impact of the condition.

“To date, the most significant study into ME is the controversial PACE Trial, which considered ME from a psychological perspective, rather than a pathological one.

“Its findings, that ME could be improved with simple lifestyle changes, a positive mental attitude and some gentle exercise known as ‘graded exercise therapy’, have formed the basis of current treatment.

“However, this trial, now regarded by many scientists as flawed and unreliable, has provoked a backlash from patient groups who report that even mild exercise can worsen symptoms and set back recovery by months or, in some cases, years.

Increased Research Funding

“Since the start of the year, I have been pressing the government for significantly increased funding for biomedical investigation.”

Since 2012, the government has invested an average of £558,333 each year into ME research – just £2.23 per patient, per year.

A spokesman for the ME Association, which campaigns to make the UK a better place for people with the illness, added: “Government funding into the causes and treatment of ME is simply pitiful compared to the size of the problem in this country.

“All the while, some people are taking their lives because they cannot bear the torture this illness brings. All we ask for is a fairer share of funding, so we can find a cure for this devastating disease sooner rather than later.

“We are very grateful that this debate will take place – but there remains a long way to go.”


Watch the debate live on TV

You can watch the Westminster Hall debate on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, live on Parliament TVIt takes place tomorrow (Thursday 21st June) from 1.30pm. The debate is expected to last for three hours:


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/rochdale-news-now-cruel-disease-is-finally-getting-attention-it-deserves-20-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Variscite Brings Peace & Harmony, Relieves Stress

Variscite Pendant

Variscite helps stress, depression and anxiety, brings loving energy, joyous feelings and aids you to find solutions to problems with trust in spirit. Beneficial for invalids or carers feeling despair about their illness.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/variscite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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The ME Association to fund six student bursaries for 2018 CMRC research conference | 19 June 2018

 


By Dr Charles Shepherd, Hon. Medical Adviser, ME Association.

The ME Association is keen to encourage undergraduate and postgraduate medical and science students to develop a clinical or research interest in ME/CFS at an early stage in their careers.

Over the years we have assisted a number of students in relation to both their entry to medical school and their studies while at medical school.

As an extension to this assistance, ME Association trustees agreed in 2015 to create a number of annual awards to fund places at the UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative conference.

This year the CMRC Research Conference will take place in Bristol on September 19th and 20th.

Details of the 2018 MEA Award Scheme

The ME Association will be funding up to six student awards.  Each award will be up to £350 for to help cover the cost of travel, accommodation and the registration fee.

To apply for one of these awards, we will require details of where you studying, what stage in the degree course you are at (which can be an undergraduate or postgraduate degree), and a short summary – of no more than 500 words – explaining why you have developed an interest in ME/CFS and why you want to attend the conference.

We are primarily seeking to encourage applications from students studying medicine. But we are also willing to consider applications from students who are studying diet, nursing, occupational therapy or physiotherapy, or any other health or science related course.

More information about the 2018 CMRC Research Conference:

2018 CMRC Research Conference: Register Now for ME/CFS Bristol Conference | 25 May 2018

Following the conference we will require a short review of the conference – no more than 500 words – from a student perspective, which could be published in our ME Essential members’ magazine.

We are able to reimburse costs of up to £250 per student as they are paid. The final instalment of £100 will only be paid on receipt of a satisfactory conference report.

Applications for these awards should be sent to the ME Association, marked for the attention of Dr Charles Shepherd. Please title your email with ‘CMRC Research Conference Application’.

There is no closing date at present but we would encourage students to send in applications as soon as possible. ME Association trustees will be assessing applications as they come in.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/the-me-association-to-fund-six-student-bursaries-for-2018-cmrc-research-conference-19-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

The House: Carol Monaghan: We must change perceptions of the debilitating illness M.E. | 19 June 2018

 


MPs have an opportunity to bring about real change in the lives of those living with M.E., writes Carol Monaghan

Empty pairs of shoes, representing patients with M.E., were on display at a “Millions Missing” rally in May. Credit: PA Images

With an estimated 250,000 people in the UK affected, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.) is poorly understood by the public and by many healthcare professionals.

Scant press coverage and a desire for quick catchy headlines has meant that perceptions of ME as “Yuppie Flu” or laziness are common, but surprisingly little is actually known about this condition.

Many sufferers report that their M.E. was first triggered by a viral infection such as flu or glandular fever and have been battling with this debilitating condition ever since.

Indeed, M.E. presents in much the same way as a flu with extreme headaches, muscular pain, poor appetite, sensitivity to light and broken sleep common.

With M.E. however, these symptoms do not abate and can remain for many years. Elderly family members are often the main carers and the effect on relationships is significant. But despite this, there is little recognition of the impact of the condition.

A major concern for M.E. groups is the lack of biomedical research into the causes and mechanisms of the illness, and the absence of effective treatment programmes.

To date, the most significant study into M.E. is the controversial PACE Trial, which considered M.E. from a psychological perspective, rather than a pathological one. Its findings, that M.E. could be improved with simple lifestyle changes, a positive mental attitude and some gentle exercise known as “Graded Exercise Therapy”, have formed the basis of current treatment. However, this trial, now regarded by many scientists as flawed and unreliable, has provoked a backlash from patient groups who report that even mild exercise can worsen symptoms and set back recovery by months or, in some cases, years.

To develop effective treatments, we need a more realistic approach to biomedical research. A recent study by researchers at Columbia University found that there were specific patterns in immune biomarkers in people with M.E., and some patients have reported improvements in their condition as a result of courses of antiviral drugs.

But how can we genuinely consider that we are able to provide treatments for a condition that as yet we do not understand?

Since the start of the year, I have been pressing the government for significantly increased funding for biomedical investigation. Recent parliamentary questions reveal that the average research spend per person living with M.E. is around £1 per year, much of which is funded, not by government, but by M.E. charities.

Compared to the economic cost of lost days at work, unemployment, and disability benefits, this is simply unacceptable. However, because of the nature of the condition, those with M.E. are often unable to campaign. One group’s name, “Millions Missing”, is an accurate description of the uphill battle faced when attempting to bring about change from a sick bed.

Since I began this work, I have been overwhelmed by the cross-party support I have received from fellow members. Their involvement sends a positive message to people who suffer from this long-term debilitating illness, and offers MPs an opportunity to bring about real change in the lives of those living with M.E.


Carol Monaghan is SNP MP for Glasgow North. Her Westminster Hall debate takes place on Thursday 21 June. The debate can be viewed via Parliament TV:




from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/06/the-house-carol-monaghan-we-must-change-perceptions-of-the-debilitating-illness-m-e-19-june-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Photo | Spiritual





from Spiritual Seeker 77
http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/post/175035092879

from http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/

#spiritual

Monday, 18 June 2018

Unakite Stone Aids Psychic Visions, Stress Relief & Peaceful Sleep

Unakite

Unakite helps to open your psychic vision aka clairvoyant ability via its energy at the third eye chakra. Healing stones that aid convalescence, helps addictions, relieves anxiety and stress, brings peaceful sleep.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/unakite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Sunday, 17 June 2018

spiritualseeker77: Story of my life! | Spiritual



spiritualseeker77:

Story of my life!



from Spiritual Seeker 77
http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/post/174985980996

from http://spiritualseeker77.tumblr.com/

#spiritual

Higher Heart Chakra Stones Aid Compassion, Heal Immune System

Dioptase

Higher Heart Chakra stones embody energy of Divine Love and aid a connection to the Etheric heart located between heart and throat chakras. See List of Stones that aid forgiveness and release of fear, boost immune system and spirituality. Aka Thymus or Thymic chakra.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/higher-heart-chakra-stones.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Selenite Crystals Connect You To Divine Light, Create Clarity

Selenite

Selenite crystals open the soul star chakra to deliver clarity of mind and to create personal transformation. Read how to use wonderful crystal healing tools such as light wands, made from Selenite.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/selenite-crystals.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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