Saturday, 31 March 2018

Magnesite Aids Deep Powerful Meditation & Creative Visualization

Magnesite

Magnesite has potent metaphysical properties and its calming vibration aids creative visualization and imagination, and clear psychic visions. It creates amazing changes in your life.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/magnesite.html

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#crystals #crystal #healing

Ways To Relieve Stress, Depression and Anxiety

Amazonite

Learn ways to relieve stress and lift your feelings when you're anxious or depressed. See list of stress relief crystals, and read about meditation, affirmations and learn other methods to lift you.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/ways-to-relieve-stress.html

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Trinity College: New research network will bolster our understanding of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome | 31 March 2018

 


Trinity College Dublin, 29 March, 2018.

Assistant Professor of Economics at Trinity, Dominic Trรฉpel, has been appointed Ireland’s representative on a newly established research network, which seeks to improve our understanding of the economic consequences and social impact of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)).

The condition significantly reduces quality of life for those affected by it and, if left unaddressed, may have significant economic implications to individuals and to wider society. There are substantial gaps in our knowledge of the impact of this complex disease, but the new ‘European Network on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (EUROMENE)’ mission is to address these.

Professor Trรฉpel said: “Despite subjective and unclear diagnostic criteria and approaches to clinical case definition, ME/CFS is increasingly recognised as a neuro-immune disorder characterised by symptoms like chronic low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, autoimmune reactions and brain disorders. However, we still don’t know much about how it develops.”

 

“Currently, the fragmented nature of ME/CFS research in Europe means there is no common platform or database on such cases, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment are lacking, and there are no inclusive estimates on the economic impact of the disease across Europe. The new European network of research groups will provide the means to address these gaps.” 

The network will establish an interconnected group of researchers working on ME/CFS and is built on the principles of multidisciplinarity, ensuring the: involvement of patients and other stakeholders; strategic coordination with multiple stakeholders; attraction of early career investigators; involvement of COST countries and Near Neighbour Countries; fostering of international cooperation.

EUROMENE is the acronym for European Network on ME/CFS.

The principal objective is to create an integrated network of researchers in the European Union/Associated and Near Neighbour Countries accompanied by a network of facilities and associated training establishments. It will also foster a full chain of translational research to further develop much-needed treatments and prevention strategies for the improvement of patients’ quality of life.


Two other members of EUROMENE are in receipt of grant funding by the ME Association Ramsay Research Fund. Dr Eliana Lacerda is a member of the UK ME/CFS Biobank team at London School Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Dr Elisa Oltra from Spain is examining micro-RNA in PBMCs and exosome-enriched vesicles in people with severe ME/CFS.

You can read about the inaugural project from EUROMENE in a blog we featured on this website last year, or visit the EUROMENE website for more information.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/trinity-college-new-research-network-will-bolster-our-understanding-of-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-31-march-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Friday, 30 March 2018

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Mar 30, How to Love Yourself to Wellness

Learning how to love yourself to wellness and practicing extreme self care is essential for a successful recovery and creating lasting health and happiness.

from Holistic Healing Blog
http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/how-to-love-yourself.html

from http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/holistic-healing-blog.html

#holistic #healing

Mar 30, How to Accept Yourself:7 Steps to Healing Your Self Image

Learning how to accept yourself is a worthy goal with big benefits. This seven step process will help you have a healthier self image and make peace with yourself...

from Holistic Healing Blog
http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/how-to-accept-yourself.html

from http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/holistic-healing-blog.html

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iridescent-indigo-children: ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ˜˜ by gypsylegends... | Spiritual



iridescent-indigo-children:

๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ˜˜ by gypsylegends https://instagram.com/p/-PLin7Cx4z/

Want a tarot card reading? My friends have received profound life insight from a quick reading.
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spiritualseeker77: No you’re not crazy - the world needs fresh... | Spiritual



spiritualseeker77:

No you’re not crazy - the world needs fresh perspectives!!! :)



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Crystal Books, Reviews Of The Best Books About Crystals

Crystal Bible

Read reviews of top crystal books. My choice of the best and most in-depth books on crystals and stones. Reading books about crystals helps you to decide the best crystal or stone to use for self healing.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/crystal-books.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Mar 30, Learning to Forgive and Release the Past

Learning to forgive others and yourself, to let go and release the emotional pains of the past is a great gift. The power of forgiveness lies not only in its ability to...

from Holistic Healing Blog
http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/learning-to-forgive.html

from http://www.holistic-mindbody-healing.com/holistic-healing-blog.html

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Judging Mind versus Discerning Mind, by Corrado Pensa

Perceiving the power of separation caused by the judging mind is also very helpful. In other words, the judging mind creates more inner solitude.

from Buddhism now
https://buddhismnow.com/2018/03/30/judging-mind-versus-discerning-mind-by-corrado-pensa/

from https://buddhismnow.com

#buddhism #buddhist #Buddha

Goshenite For Clear Thinking, Truth & Lucid Dreams

Goshenite

Goshenite aka White Beryl aids clear thinking, helps inspire truth in both you and others. It boosts analytical mental ability, mathematical mastery and heightened lucid dreams.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/goshenite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Thursday, 29 March 2018

EMF Protection Crystals Assist Electromagnetic Sensitivity

Black Tourmaline

Discover EMF protection crystals and read how to mitigate EMFs. See list of stones for electrical sensitivity that aid healing caused by electromagnetic smog from devices you are using.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/emf-protection-crystals.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Blue Hemimorphite Aids Mediumship, Enhances Communication

Blue Hemimorphite

Blue Hemimorphite aids channeling, mediumship and enhances communication. This powerful ascension stone adds light to your auric field, brings an increase in joy and improves your emotional state.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/blue-hemimorphite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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We need your help to exhibit the ME Knitathon in Coventry Cathedral during ME Awareness Week | 29 March 2018

 


A HUGE thank you to everyone who has kindly supported Lauren Childs’s call for knitted squares for her All about ME Knitathon project.

Her aim now is to exhibit the blankets she is making at Coventry Cathedral for the duration of ME Awareness Week (7th – 13th May).

Lauren will donate her finished blankets to people with severe M.E. around the UK

Lauren writes, “I decided to set up a knitathon for ME awareness week 2018 as I believe doing something once a day that makes you happy (no matter what, no matter how well you do it, or how long for), keeps you going and keeps you mentally strong too!”

We’ve lost count of how many boxes of knitted squares we’ve mailed off to Lauren for her M.E. Knitathon project.

She now has the makings of quite a few blankets and is seeking help with sourcing and erecting quilting frames etc. to aid the display of these.

Helen Hyland, ME Association Fundraising Manager, says, “The ME Community has responded magnificently to Lauren’s call for squares and almost every single square has been sent with special messages and greetings, explaining how M.E. has affected people’s lives not just in UK but from around the world.

“Now we’ve got to find the best way to showcase these efforts and get those messages to a wider audience and we’re writing to ask for your help. We need staging to mount and display the blankets to good effect in Coventry Cathedral, and we need people to help with the actual displaying.

“There’s also a good chance that she’ll get to show some of the work at the #MillionsMissing demonstration at Birmingham Cathedral that week as well.

“If you can give Lauren a hand, then please contact her via her All About ME Knitathon Facebook page.”

If you don’t live near Coventry but would like to see what Lauren has been up to then visit her Facebook page. It reveals many of the stories and a whole host of the knitted and crocheted squares she has received.

Lauren hopes to display the completed blankets in a virtual exhibition on her Facebook page through ME Awareness Week before they are to be donated to people with severe M.E. around the UK.

And if you would like to donate to Lauren’s fundraising challenge, please visit her JustGiving page.

Thank you.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/we-need-your-help-to-exhibit-the-me-knitathon-in-coventry-cathedral-during-me-awareness-week-29-march-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Wednesday, 28 March 2018

6 essential oils that help in skin rejuvenation

Your skin is a reflection of your inner health. It is the reflection of the hidden realities within your body. It is essential to understand that skin conditions are not...

from Ayurveda India – Ayurvedic Remedies | Holistic Health
http://www.ayurvedictalk.com/6-essential-oils-that-help-in-skin-rejuvenation/2934/

from http://www.ayurvedictalk.com

#ayurveda #ayurvedic

Spurrite For Good Humor, Optimism & Spiritual Connections

Spurrite

Spurrite aka Strombolite aids good humor, creates connections to mystical and angelic realms, helps emotions of grief, helps you to know that this too shall pass and that life is in Divine order.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/spurrite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Tuesday, 27 March 2018

Spirit Quartz Crystals Help You To Develop Your Higher Self

Spirit Quartz

Spirit Quartz Crystals or Cactus Quartz from South Africa assist spiritual growth, move you spiritually to the next level. Lovely range of colors, tiny crystals radiate energy outwards.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/spirit-quartz.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Monday, 26 March 2018

spiritualseeker77: Healing frequencies for psychic ability and... | Spiritual



spiritualseeker77:

Healing frequencies for psychic ability and spiritual awakening! - Many FREE audios to try!

Learn more & get the free app at http://onelink.to/pjmmu7 ๐Ÿ˜€๐Ÿ˜€



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spiritualseeker77: Story of my life! | Spiritual



spiritualseeker77:

Story of my life!



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spiritualseeker77: Your fortune for today :-) | Spiritual



spiritualseeker77:

Your fortune for today :-)



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Covellite Is A Doorway To Remembering Your Past Lives

Covellite Pendant

Covellite develops intuition, helps find spirit guides, enhance lucid dreaming, helps you transform your dreams into reality, stimulates psychic gifts such as clairvoyance. A healing stone for breast cancer, brings a positive outlook.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/covellite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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The GETSET Trial: Letters to The Lancet and a response from the authors | 26 March 2018

 


GETSET was a clinical trial in secondary care of a new approach for people with ME/CFS and it was published in the Lancet on 22 June 2017.

The trial used the principles of graded exercise therapy, delivered in a self-help booklet, with up to four sessions of assistance offered remotely by trained physiotherapists via phone or Skype.

A total of five letters have now appeared in the Lancet critiquing elements of the trial, and the authors have now issued a response to all of them (below).


ME Association position

In view of the fact that the results from this clinical trial are going to form part of the research evidence that NICE will be examining – in relation to the new clinical guideline – ME Association trustees decided that we should make a very careful and thorough response to the study. We published our review on 28th June 2017.

ME Association Review of GETSET

For the benefit of anyone who just requires a summary of the key points and concerns that we made, our main criticisms were:

  1. GES (Graded Exercise Self-help) had little or no effect on physical function and did not result in participants claiming that GES had any significant overall effect on their ME/CFS
  2. The study design – i.e. addition of a new primary outcome measure – was altered after the trial had started
  3. Patients were recruited using the very broad NICE diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS – which meant a significant proportion did not meet Fukada and are unlikely to have met the Canadian diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS
  4. The trial recruited an unrepresentative number of people who were likely to have been in the mild category of illness severity, could exercise, and were enthusiastic about taking part.  This is not representative of the overall ME/CFS population
  5. The trial relied on self-reported and subjective outcome measures rather than employing any form of objective outcome measure (e.g. use of an actometer) for measuring changes in physical activity levels
  6. Examining and reporting on the results after only 12 weeks of treatment is far too short to draw any meaningful conclusions about the efficacy and safety of GES
  7. The study was not blinded – for obvious reasons. However, we believe that this sort of approach to activity management, where there has to be considerable individual variation in approach, is not really suitable for assessment in randomised controlled trials that rely on subjective outcome measures

The Lancet – Graded exercise self-help for chronic fatigue syndrome in GETSET

Authors’ reply

Lucy V Clark, Francesca Pesola, Janice M Thomas, Mario Vergara-Williamson, Michelle Beynon, Peter D White.

Published: 24 March 2018

In the graded exercise therapy guided self-help treatment (GETSET) trial,1 we found that addition of guided graded exercise self-help (GES) to specialist medical care (SMC) safely improved fatigue and physical functioning more than did the comparison treatment of SMC alone.

Frank Twisk suggests that GES is not a rehabilitative intervention as the GES group did not return patients to normal levels of fatigue and physical functioning, and Joan Crawford is unimpressed with the effect size of GES for improving functioning. We suggest that an improvement in the main symptom of fatigue with an effect size of 0·53 is clinically useful.1 We have already acknowledged the small size of the effect on physical functioning (0·20), but our finding that the effect size was greater in those with the worst baseline physical functioning suggests this might represent a ceiling effect.

Therapists reported that 29% of patients did not adhere more than “slightly” to the exercise programme, despite 88% attending at least 75% of their guided support. This area requires more research to understand non-adherence and how it might be improved.2

We used the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) definition of chronic fatigue syndrome as these are the commonest criteria used by UK clinicians in secondary care.3 A subgroup analysis using two other definitions of chronic fatigue syndrome made no significant difference to the findings. There were no significant differences in safety outcomes between treatment arms once missing data were accounted for.

Anna Wood is concerned about adherence to GES and missing data; both were reported in the paper and neither significantly altered our findings or conclusions.1 The use of outcome assessments by mail and available resources prevented the use of objective measures, such as actigraphy, as suggested by Crawford. We suggest that using patient-reported outcome measures is sensible in symptom-defined illnesses such as chronic fatigue syndrome. The largest trial of pacing therapy suggested that it had a worse, not better, safety profile when compared to more active rehabilitation interventions similar to GES.4

In response to Robert Saunders, we can confirm that all patients reported post-exertional malaise (PEM) and/or fatigue at baseline (as is required to meet NICE criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome); no patients were excluded based on having PEM. A previous trial showed that post-exertional fatigue improved more after graded exercise therapy compared to after both SMC alone and pacing therapy.5The lack of a significant difference in safety outcomes between treatment arms reinforces the safety of GES for chronic fatigue syndrome.

Karen Kirke is concerned about severely affected patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. We acknowledge that all participants were required to attend a clinical assessment, which would exclude those that were housebound.1 That being said, use of teletherapy for patients too unwell to attend clinic is an innovative approach that merits further research.6, 7

PDW reports grants from the UK National Institute of Health Research and the Sue Estermann Fund during the conduct of the study, and personal fees from Swiss Re-insurance company outside the submitted work; he is an appointed member of the Independent Medical Experts’ Group, a non-governmental body, which advises the UK Ministry of Defence about its Armed Forces Compensation Scheme. PDW provided unpaid advice to the UK Department for Work and Pensions until 2015. All other authors declare no competing interests.


The Lancet – Letters of concern

Frank Twisk

Published: 24 March 2018

The results of the guided graded exercise self-help trial (GETSET) by Lucy Clark and colleaguesreaffirm that graded exercise therapy (GET) is not a rehabilitative treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome.2

Although fatigue (measured by Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire [CFQ]) and physical functioning (assessed using the Short Form-36 physical function [SF-36 PF] subscale) improved in the guided graded exercise self-help (GES) group (and the non-intervention group), these effects were by far insufficient to come close to the normal levels defined previously3 by one of the GETSET authors (CFQ ≤6 and SF-36 PF ≥85).

The observation that ”physiotherapists reported that […] 42% adhered to GES completely or very well, […] 30% moderately well, and […] 29% slightly or not at all”1 makes far-reaching conclusions impossible.

Also, the trial1 selected patients using National Institute for Health and Care Excellence criteria, rather than the commonly used Fukuda criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome.4 Although limiting the analysis to participants who met these Fukuda criteria did not change the results, the authors also state that the ”relative absence of intervention by diagnostic subgroup interactions might be related to the study not being powered to detect all interactions“.1

Finally, the conclusion that GET is a safe intervention is at odds with another GETSET publication,which reported that a chronic fatigue syndrome patient subgroup deteriorated due to GET and observed that the “deteriorated group reported experiencing more barriers to GET, including a worse exacerbation of symptoms in response to GET”.5

Overall, the conclusion that GET is an effective and safe treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome is not substantiated by the outcomes.

I declare no competing interests.


Joan Crawford

Published: 24 March 2018

The mean score for physical functioning (measured by the Short Form-36 [SF-36] subscale)1 for people aged 35–44 years is 93·3 (SD 13·4).2

Participants in the GETSET trial by Lucy Clark and colleagues3 had a mean age of 38·1 years in the active treatment arm (guided graded exercise self-help [GES] group) and 38·7 years in the control group.

After the short 12-week intervention, participants’ mean self-reported physical functioning score using the SF-36 scale was 55·7 (23·3) in the GES group, an increase from 47·3 (22·2) before the intervention, compared with a slight increase in physical functioning in the control group from 50·1 (22·6) to 50·8 (25·3).3

Clark and colleagues state that “GES significantly improved fatigue and physical functioning compared with SMC [specialist medical care] alone”. However, this modest change in a self-reported outcome measure in a non-blinded trial, in which bias is highly likely without use of objective measures of activity, is extremely unlikely to translate to a clinically meaningful improvement for patients. Nor does this change return them anywhere close to healthy and robust good physical functioning compared with controls, which patients heartily desire.

Overall, these observations suggest such modest improvements are unlikely to be due to countering deconditioning and exercise avoidance as proposed by the authors, but are much more likely to be accounted for by nothing more than the placebo effect, in other words a desire by patients to please their therapists.

Moreover, there was no attempt during this trial to obtain measurable objective activity levels to ascertain if patients increased exercise and activity or complied with the intervention at all.

I declare no competing interests.


Anna Wood

Published: 24 March 2018

The CONSORT statement on harms notes that “it is important to report participants who are non-adherent or lost to follow-up because their actions may reflect their inability to tolerate the intervention.”1

It is thus welcome that Lucy Clark and colleagues2 report physiotherapist-rated data on adherence; they considered that only 42% of participants adhered to guided graded exercise self-help (GES) completely or very well.

The protocol notes that to “measure departure from intended treatment, participants will be asked at follow-up whether they adhered to the booklet and guidance, and how much PA [physical activity] they undertook in the past week.”3 It would be useful if Clark and colleagues could now also publish such data.

A review of eight surveys (n=4338) found 51% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis reported being harmed by graded exercise therapy (GET).4 Unsurprsingly, such findings have led to concern about GET’s safety. It would therefore be preferable if researchers also used and reported on other objective tools to measure adherence, such as actometers and heart rate monitors, which are much more readily available now than in the past.

According to the GES Therapist Manual “a central concept of GET and GES is to maintain exercise as much as possible during a CFS/ME [chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis] setback.”5More adherence data could help investigate whether the lower rates of harm found in research studies are due to patients not complying with this central concept and instead using pacing, which has been associated with a lower rate of harm in surveys.4

I declare no competing interests.


Robert Saunders

Published: 24 March 2018

I was surprised to read that the GETSET trial by Lucy Clark and colleagues1 excluded participants who had physical contraindications to exercise, as such a criterion would appear to exclude anyone suffering from post-exertional malaise (PEM).

In its 2015 report,2 the US Institute of Medicine concluded: “There is sufficient evidence that PEM is a primary feature that helps distinguish ME/CFS [myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome] from other conditions”. Indeed, post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion is a compulsory requirement for a diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis under the International Consensus Criteria.3

The disputed National Institute for Health and Care Excellence criteria that were used in the GETSET trial1 are less precise, stating that “post-exertional fatigue and/or malaise” must be present for a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis to be considered, whereas “physical or mental exertion makes symptoms worse” is only listed as a possible symptom, not a requirement.4

Whether Clark and colleagues interpreted post-exertional fatigue to mean the abnormal physical responses to exertion that have been reported in other myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome studies is unclear.5 If they did, it would appear that the GETSET participation requirements were self-contradictory. If they did not (as the inclusion of patients with high baseline Short Form-36 physical function scores suggests), this should be made clear.

Nevertheless, given the inherent bias of unblinded trials that rely on subjective outcome measures,6with less than one in five participants having reported any benefit from guided graded exercise self-help, the evidence GETSET provides that this strategy is unlikely to be beneficial to most people diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (however it is defined) should not be overlooked.

I declare no competing interests.


Karen D Kirke

Published: 24 March 2018

Lucy Clark and colleagues1 (July 22, 2017, p 363) reported that guided graded exercise self-help (GES) for chronic fatigue syndrome was “more useful in those with worse physical functioning”, defined as a Short Form-36 physical function (SF-36 PF) score of 40 or less.

As follow-up GES sessions were done by Skype and telephone, this result might suggest to some clinicians the possibility of modifying and extending this intervention to patients with severe and very severe chronic fatigue syndrome, all of whom are housebound and some of whom are bedbound. Indeed, the accompanying commentary acknowledges that patients with severe chronic fatigue syndrome were ineligible for this secondary-care trial, but suggests that GETSET shows that “graded exercise is effective even in individuals with severe symptoms.”2

GETSET’s sample was higher-functioning than in previous trials, with a baseline mean SF-36 PF score of 49, compared to PACE’s 38 and FINE’s 30.1, 3, 4 Housebound patients have been reported to have a mean SF-36 PF of 17.5

Extrapolating GETSET’s reported modest short-term gains for a small number of higher-functioning patients to the severe and very severe group is likely to be inappropriate. When trials included some severe patients, such as FINE’s 11% non-ambulatory patients, no short-term or long-term benefit to physical functioning for rehabilitation over usual care was found.4 When patients undertook graded exercise therapy with chronic fatigue syndrome specialised therapists, 39% of severe to very severe patients reported being very much worse afterwards, compared to 22% of mild to moderate patients.6

Available evidence suggests that with interventions aimed at increasing activity, severe to very severe patients with chronic fatigue syndrome do worse, not better, than their milder counterparts.

I declare no competing interests.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/the-getset-trial-letters-to-the-lancet-and-a-response-from-the-authors-26-march-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

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Sunday, 25 March 2018

Sphene also known as Titanite Aids Mental Ability

Sphene

Sphene accelerates learning, helps you to think clearly and be more organized. It will help to manifest money and strengthen will-power. Aids you to develop psychic visions and intuition.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/sphene.html

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Bloodstone aka Heliotrope Instils Courage, Comfort and Strength

Bloodstone

Bloodstone or Heliotrope is a March birthstone known to have magical and mystical powers. An excellent healing stone that assists you to regain personal power, build courage, strength of mind and confidence.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/bloodstone.html

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Saturday, 24 March 2018

Pink Tourmaline, Loving Energy, Emotional and Spiritual Healing

Pink Tourmaline

Pink Tourmaline has powerful metaphysical properties for healing stress and emotional or mood related problems. A birthstone for October, it brings love, joy and happiness into your life.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/pink-tourmaline.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Photo | Spiritual





from Spiritual Seeker 77
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from Spiritual Seeker 77
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Connecting With Angels, Use Crystals To Contact Angelic Realm

Golden Amphibole Quartz

Learn about connecting with Angels. See list of specific crystals to use to elevate you to the Angelic realms, to meet Angels and ask for their help. These loving beings are there for every one of you. Do you wonder how to go about this?



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/connecting-with-angels.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Friday, 23 March 2018

Law Of Attraction Books Are About Manifesting What You Desire

Law Of Attraction books

Learn about Law Of Attraction books with ideas to help you to bring the things you desire into your life. Written by well-known authors to help you to understand this amazing law better.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/law-of-attraction-books.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

The Depth of Truth is Bottomless, by Harada Tangen Roshi

You too are perfectly protected. It just isn’t obvious to you.

from Buddhism now
https://buddhismnow.com/2018/03/23/the-depth-of-truth-is-bottomless-by-harada-tangen-roshi/

from https://buddhismnow.com

#buddhism #buddhist #Buddha

Axinite, Strong Grounding Action, Boosts Strength & Endurance

Axinite

Axinite aids you to make life changes. Strong spiritual grounding stones that stimulate your mind, improve your memory and aid meditation by stopping intrusive thoughts.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/axinite.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

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Forward ME Letter to The Times: Patients with ME/CFS ‘are not simply “deconditioned” as claimed by many psychiatrists’ | 23 March 2018

 


Letter to The Times, 23rd March, 2018.

Treatment for patients with M.E.

Sir,

The article by Tom Whipple, (“Findings of £5m ME chronic fatigue study ‘worthless’,” Mar 22) highlights a long-standing problem.

“Forced exercise above very low levels characteristically incapacitates most patients.”

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) is in the process of replacing its guideline for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), but this will take time.

Patients with ME/CFS in this country continue to receive damaging treatment in the form of graded exercise therapy (GET). Despite evidence of disabling metabolic abnormalities in their muscles, patients are advised to “exercise back to fitness”.

They are not simply “deconditioned” as claimed by many psychiatrists. Forced exercise above very low levels characteristically incapacitates most patients.

The “exercise will make you better doctrine” applied to ME/CFS is profoundly incorrect and has no scientific evidence base.

The human cost is enormous, with many sufferers from ME/CFS rendered worse by inappropriate medical management.

Even worse, such management is inflicted compulsorily on some patients, both adults and children, with their informed consent being bypassed via the use of mental health and child protection legislation.

Signatures

Countess of Mar, Forward-ME; Dr William Weir, infectious disease consultant; Dr Nigel Speight, paediatrician; Dr Charles Shepherd, ME association; Dr Vance Spence, ME research UK; Jonathan Davies, ME research UK; Dr Gareth Tuckwell, ME trust; Dr Paul Worthley, ME trust; Jane Colby, Tymes trust; Helen Brownlie, 25 per cent ME group; Tanya and Christine Harrison, Brame; William and Janice Kent, Remember; Hannah Clifton, ME trust; Clare Ogden, Action for ME


Forward ME website


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/forward-me-letter-to-the-times-patients-with-me-cfs-are-not-simply-deconditioned-as-claimed-by-many-psychiatrists-23-march-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

Thursday, 22 March 2018

Aragonite Star Clusters aka The Conservationists Stone

Aragonite Star Cluster

Aragonite Star Clusters heal you emotionally and spiritually and help you overcome stress and anxiety, and help you to contact angels and other spiritual beings. Aids earth healing.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/aragonite-star-clusters.html

from https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/healing-crystals-blog.html

#crystals #crystal #healing

Reanalysis of the PACE trial finds impressive claims for recovery following CBT and GET are ‘not statistically reliable’ | 22 March 2018

 


ME Association Press Release, 21st March 2018.

Benefits reported in a controversial medical trial part-funded by the Department of Work of Pensions were “not reliable,” a major study has found.

A large-scale, government-funded trial, known as PACE, claimed psychotherapy and exercise helped the estimated 250,000 sufferers of the devastating illness, M.E. (myalgic encephalomyelitis).

“We found that the groups receiving CBT or GET did not significantly outperform the control group…” Carolyne Wilshire.

Manifesting as unrelenting fatigue and profound pain, the condition, also known as chronic fatigue syndrome, has no known cure and is made worse by exertion.

Sufferers are often confined to their beds, unable to walk, and need help even to shower – an action that could then lay them low for hours, days, weeks or longer.

When the results of the five-year PACE trial were published in 2011, researchers claimed that graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) were “moderately effective” forms of treatment.

The trial concluded that both treatments led to recovery in over a fifth of patients.

But PACE has since faced intense criticism from patients and charities, such as the ME Association, over how the results were obtained, analysed and presented.

Parliament has previously heard claims that the data was deliberately flawed to “remove people from long-term benefits and reduce the welfare bill”.

After a long legal battle, unpublished data from the trial was released and has now been independently reanalysed. The paper, published in the journal BMC Psychology, has found that the benefits reported for psychotherapy and exercise therapy are modest and not statistically reliable.

Lead author Carolyn Wilshire, said:

“Our reanalysis was designed to explore how the PACE trial outcomes would have looked if the investigators had adhered to the primary outcome they described in their original published protocol.

“We also looked into the published data on long-term outcomes to examine whether they had been influenced by the treatments patients had received after the trial had ended.

“We found that the groups receiving CBT or GET did not significantly outperform the control group after correcting for the number of comparisons specified in the trial protocol. Rates of recovery were consistently low and not significantly different across treatment groups.”

In surveys carried out by the ME Association, more than half of patients who had followed the recommended graded exercise programme saw a worsening in their symptoms.

Dr Charles Shepherd, Honorary Medical Adviser to the ME Association, today said:

“The ME Association has always been very critical of the way in which the PACE trial was designed, especially the lack of any objective outcome measures.

“And we have not been impressed by the way in which the results have been reported in medical journals, especially claims relating to recovery following CBT and GET.

“…CBT and GET are not effective ways of treating a serious neuroimmune disease.” Dr Charles Shepherd.

“So, it comes as no surprise to find that a very careful re-analysis of some of the PACE trial data by Carolyn Wilshire and colleagues has concluded that impressive claims for recovery following CBT and GET are not statistically reliable.

“It is also very concerning to note that this data was only released through use of the Freedom of Information Act and a very costly Tribunal – which ordered the release of data.

“This sends a powerful message to the research community that they must be willing to share data where there are serious concerns about protocols or the reliability of results from a clinical trial.

“The ME Association believes that it is very important to encourage research data sharing and, where appropriate, independent reanalysis – which is why we made a significant financial contribution towards the processing fee for publication of this paper.

“The message is clear – CBT and GET are not effective ways of treating a serious neuroimmune disease. The sooner this message gets across to health professionals the better.”

The PACE trial data was used justify NHS recommendations of exercise and cognitive behaviour therapy and no changes were made as a result.

But a patient revolt has forced the government and NICE (the National Institute of Clinical Excellence) to review the guidelines used by UK doctors. That review may not be completed before 2020.


BMC Psychology

Rethinking the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome—a reanalysis and evaluation of findings from a recent major trial of graded exercise and CBT

Authors: 
Carolyn E. Wilshire, Tom KindlonRobert CourtneyAlem MattheesDavid TullerKeith Geraghty and Bruce Levin.

Abstract:

Background

The PACE trial was a well-powered randomised trial designed to examine the efficacy of graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome. Reports concluded that both treatments were moderately effective, each leading to recovery in over a fifth of patients. However, the reported analyses did not consistently follow the procedures set out in the published protocol, and it is unclear whether the conclusions are fully justified by the evidence.

Methods

Here, we present results based on the original protocol-specified procedures. Data from a recent Freedom of Information request enabled us to closely approximate these procedures. We also evaluate the conclusions from the trial as a whole.

Results

On the original protocol-specified primary outcome measure – overall improvement rates – there was a significant effect of treatment group. However, the groups receiving CBT or GET did not significantly outperform the Control group after correcting for the number of comparisons specified in the trial protocol. Also, rates of recovery were consistently low and not significantly different across treatment groups. Finally, on secondary measures, significant effects were almost entirely confined to self-report measures. These effects did not endure beyond two years.

Conclusions

These findings raise serious concerns about the robustness of the claims made about the efficacy of CBT and GET. The modest treatment effects obtained on self-report measures in the PACE trial do not exceed what could be reasonably accounted for by participant reporting biases.


Media Coverage

The Times: Findings of £5m ME chronic fatigue study ‘worthless’

By Tom Whipple, Science Editor, 22nd March, 2018.

A landmark £5 million study that formed the basis for NHS treatment of ME sufferers has been heavily criticised for its “troubling” use of data, in new research that claims its recommendations were largely worthless.

Scientists have questioned the robustness of a study that recommended exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy for ME sufferers ANNA GOWTHORPE/PA

Since 2011 the estimated 250,000 Britons with ME, also known as chronic fatigue syndrome, have been offered treatment based on exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy, after a study known as the Pace trial was published in The Lancet and seemed to show this approach improved symptoms.

Now, after a freedom of information request forced the scientists behind the 2011 study to release their raw data, other researchers have performed their own analysis. They said their study, published in the journal BMC Psychology, raised “serious concerns about the robustness of the claims” made about exercise and therapy.

Keith Geraghty, from the University of Manchester, said at the very least the £5 million trial represented wasted resources. “I would argue it could have been spent more wisely,” he added.

The authors of the original Pace trial stood by their findings.


BBC News: Chronic fatigue trial results ‘not robust’, new study says

BBC Health, 22nd March, 2018

Fresh analysis of a controversial study, which recommended exercise and psychological therapy for people with chronic fatigue syndrome, suggests their impact is more modest than first thought.

The PACE trial found the treatments to be “moderately effective”, leading to recovery in a fifth of patients. But this new analysis finds “no long-term benefits at all”.

GETTY IMAGES

The authors of the original trial in 2007 said they stood by their findings.

That randomised trial was designed to examine the effectiveness of graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis, or ME.

Its findings were positive, but patient groups like the ME Association have always been critical of the way the trial was designed and the way the results were reported.

Goalposts ‘moved’

There has also been controversy over the release of data from the trial, with some arguing it should be made available to all researchers for further analysis.

The PACE trial reported that 59% of patients who received CBT and 61% who had exercise therapy had improved overall, compared with 45% in a control group.

When the results were re-examined, after data was obtained under a Freedom of Information request, researchers found that just 20% of CBT patients and 21% of GET patients improved, along with 10% of control patients.

Figures for those who recovered were originally reported as 22% for patients in each of the CBT and GET groups, but this reduced to 8% in the latest re-analysis.

Writing in the journal BMC Psychology, lead author Dr Carolyn Wilshire, from the University of Wellington in New Zealand, said the PACE trial moved the goalposts by changing the way treatment success was measured after the trial had begun.

She added: “Until there is positive evidence to suggest otherwise, the conclusion we must draw is that PACE’s treatment effects are not sustained over the long term, not even on self-report measures.

“CBT and GET have no long-term benefits at all. Patients do just as well with good basic medical care.”

Modestly effective treatment

The ME Association, which part-funded the new study, said it was no surprise that “impressive claims for recovery following CBT and GET are not statistically reliable”.

Dr Jon Stone, consultant neurologist at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh, said better treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome were needed, or more effective forms of rehabilitation.

“Until we have these, the question is whether it is better to offer a modestly effective treatment supported by data from many other trials, with a realistic discussion of its pros and cons, than none at all.”

The three authors of the original PACE trial – Prof Michael Sharpe, from the University of Oxford, and Prof Trudie Chalder and Dr Kimberley Goldsmith, from King’s College London, said the new analysis had used only part of the data from the trial.

They also said many other trials and meta-analyses had replicated the findings of the PACE trial.

“In conclusion, we find little of substance in this critique and stand by our original reports.”

NICE is currently updating its guidance on the diagnosis and management of chronic fatigue syndrome.


 



from ME Association
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/reanalysis-of-the-pace-trial-finds-impressive-claims-for-recovery-following-cbt-and-get-are-not-statistically-reliable-22-march-2018/

from http://www.meassociation.org.uk

#cfsme

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from Spiritual Seeker 77
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Wednesday, 21 March 2018

Cerussite For Spiritual Alchemy, Infuses Aura With Light

Cerussite

Cerussite aids change and spiritual transformation via spiritual alchemy. Links base and crown chakras to energize you. Grounding, enhances creativity, brings clarity of thought and improved concentration.



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/cerussite.html

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Want To Learn About Aries Birthstones?

Natural Aquamarine Stone

The Aries Astrological sign starts on March 21st. If you were born under this star sign take a look at the list of Zodiac birthstones for Aries. If you are an Aries check out the list of crystals for your sign. You can see your zodiac birthstones as well as those for the other starsigns as well!



from Healing Crystals For You
https://www.healing-crystals-for-you.com/aries-birthstone.html

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from Spiritual Seeker 77
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